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Less Boot - And More To Love

Less Boot - And more to love

Less Boot - And More To Love

POSTED BY DAVID BOLLER | AUGUST, 9 2018

Boots, more so than any other type of shoe, have gained a kind of mythology around them. A symbol of handwork and the working man. The footwear of explorers and pioneers (those are boot prints on the moon, you know). You probably even know a guy who claims to have pulled himself up by his own boot straps.

There is a reason for that. Boots have always been about function. A tool to accomplish a task or part of the gear you need to reach the next summit. When function is king, innovation never stops. That’s a great thing.

The Boulder Boot from Lems is a good example of that innovation, and of relatively new category of shoe. It’s hard to point to a single name for this new breed of shoe, but “Minimalist” comes pretty close. These category was built on the assertion that “less is more”, and it’s gaining popularity all over the world. We can again look to the Boulder Boot to understand why. In a sea of heavy, clunky, or stiff boots, the Boulder is flexible, lightweight, and designed to let your feet work like they were designed to. Let me explain in a little more detail:

The Boulder Boot is shaped like your foot. This may seem obvious, but it’s not quite as simple as you may think. Gloves are a great way of explaining this. All gloves are shaped roughly like hands, but we all know how uncomfortable a poor-fitting pair of gloves are.

Most shoes are only roughly foot shaped. The foot box is usually too narrow around the toes. This actually prevents your toes from splaying apart, therefore reducing balance. Most of us have just grown up with our toes crammed into narrow shoes, so we haven’t notice.

A natural foot-shaped shoe like the Boulder Boot allows your feet to move freely and naturally, without restrictions. Lems has taken this concept a step further with their “zero drop” construction. In practice this means that the Boulder Boot has no heel in order to better replicate how you would walk when barefoot. Put it all together, and you have a healthier foot, increased balance, and less pain/fatigue.

Minimalist shoes, like the Boulder Boot, are also designed to be incredibly flexible. One quarter of your body’s bones are in your feet. A normal foot has 33 joints, 26 bones, 19 muscles, and 107 ligaments. All of the bones, joints, muscle, and ligaments exist to allow the foot to move.

Our feet are build to adjust to our surroundings. Adapt to different terrain and situations. Stiff, heavy shoes (such as traditional boots) limit the foots ability to respond to such terrain. There are certain situations where you need that heavy, stiff shoe (construction, manufacturing, etc.), but in most situations it will actually cause long term problems.

Imagine wearing a cast on your right arm your whole life. Your arm would not develop to it’s full potential. By allowing your foot to flex, move, and adapt, you are essentially exercising them. Over time, this leads to healthier, stronger, and more flexible feet. Stiff shoes that restrict the movement of your feet have the opposite affect.

Me in New Zealand

I had the opportunity to try out the boulder boot while on assignment in New Zealand. I was surprised by how light-weight it was. The flexible construction and foot-shaped soles gave me a surprising amount of comfort and confidence. They never felt flimsy, and my feet always felt protected. I just had an increased awareness of the terrain I was on.

Based on my first impressions, I can understand what all the hype is about.

Less Boot - And More To Love

The Freewaters Trifecta:

A Different Kind of Sandal

POSTED BY DAVID BOLLER | AUGUST, 9 2018

Boots, more so than any other type of shoe, have gained a kind of mythology around them. A symbol of handwork and the working man. The footwear of explorers and pioneers (those are boot prints on the moon, you know). You probably even know a guy who claims to have pulled himself up by his own boot straps. There is a reason for that. Boots have always been about function. A tool to accomplish a task or part of the gear you need to reach the next summit. When function is king, innovation never stops. That’s a great thing.

The Boulder Boot from Lems is a good example of that innovation, and of relatively new category of shoe. It’s hard to point to a single name for this new breed of shoe, but “Minimalist” comes pretty close. These category was built on the assertion that “less is more”, and it’s gaining popularity all over the world. We can again look to the Boulder Boot to understand why. In a sea of heavy, clunky, or stiff boots, the Boulder is flexible, lightweight, and designed to let your feet work like they were designed to. Let me explain in a little more detail:

The Boulder Boot is shaped like your foot. This may seem obvious, but it’s not quite as simple as you may think. Gloves are a great way of explaining this. All gloves are shaped roughly like hands, but we all know how uncomfortable a poor-fitting pair of gloves are.

Most shoes are only roughly foot shaped. The foot box is usually too narrow around the toes. This actually prevents your toes from splaying apart, therefore reducing balance. Most of us have just grown up with our toes crammed into narrow shoes, so we haven’t notice.

A natural foot-shaped shoe like the Boulder Boot allows your feet to move freely and naturally, without restrictions. Lems has taken this concept a step further with their “zero drop” construction. In practice this means that the Boulder Boot has no heel in order to better replicate how you would walk when barefoot. Put it all together, and you have a healthier foot, increased balance, and less pain/fatigue.

Minimalist shoes, like the Boulder Boot, are also designed to be incredibly flexible. One quarter of your body’s bones are in your feet. A normal foot has 33 joints, 26 bones, 19 muscles, and 107 ligaments. All of the bones, joints, muscle, and ligaments exist to allow the foot to move.

Our feet are build to adjust to our surroundings. Adapt to different terrain and situations. Stiff, heavy shoes (such as traditional boots) limit the foots ability to respond to such terrain. There are certain situations where you need that heavy, stiff shoe (construction, manufacturing, etc.), but in most situations it will actually cause long term problems.

Imagine wearing a cast on your right arm your whole life. Your arm would not develop to it’s full potential. By allowing your foot to flex, move, and adapt, you are essentially exercising them. Over time, this leads to healthier, stronger, and more flexible feet. Stiff shoes that restrict the movement of your feet have the opposite affect.

I had the opportunity to try out the boulder boot while on assignment in New Zealand. I was surprised by how light-weight it was. The flexible construction and foot-shaped soles gave me a surprising amount of comfort and confidence. They never felt flimsy, and my feet always felt protected. I just had an increased awareness of the terrain I was on.

Based on my first impressions, I can understand what all the hype is about.

Want to snag a pair of the Boulder Boot?

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2 comments

Aug 28, 2018 • Posted by Miha Berčič

…and securty error on shop link button.

Aug 10, 2018 • Posted by Colt

Got a few typos

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